24 Hour Hackathon People

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Hackers in action at Hacking Aid (Photo: WFP/Angie Lee)

 

As some of you might have already guessed, we at mVAM LOVE hackathons. Last weekend, we had a chance to participate in another one: “Hacking Aid” which was organized by the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs and PwC, together with UNHCR, OCHA and Leiden University’s Center of Innovation. This event brought together more than 70 participants from all walks of life – students, aid workers, programmers, developers, linguists, teachers, professionals from the private sector and government. A common thread linked them all: they were brimming with ideas to find digital solutions to some of the pressing challenges the humanitarian community currently faces.

The overall theme of this particular hackathon centered on finding ways to make humanitarian aid more efficient and transparent. Specifically, we looked at solutions that would enable self-reporting by affected populations, so that people in need would be able to report where, when and what type of help is needed.

In order to come up with specific challenges that could be addressed with practical solutions, we had a rapid prototyping session (a.k.a. think hard and quick) to define a problem around collecting and reporting data. This was followed by an open-mic stage, where we pitched our challenges to the hackers.

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Wael explains what we need (Photo: WFP/Angie Lee)

After working away for nearly 24 hours straight, the twelve teams submitted their final outputs for evaluation by an independent jury panel. The winner of the Hacking Aid award, Team Dream Catchers, developed an app to register complaints and feedback, even offline, from refugees in camps. The second winner, Team Seeing Hunger, proposed a solution to WFP’s challenge: a chatbot tool to pick up and verify self-initiated feedback or reports coming through social media.

A special mention went to Team Botcast, which won the Tech Award for the technically most impressive prototype with their chatbot for Dabanga radio station in Darfur. The chatbot facilitates the process of handling requests for assistance and protection. Team Transformers took home the Innovation Award for their app “Noci”, which uses audiovisual techniques to enable those whom are not able to read or write to report on their needs. 

The winners of the hackathon will have a change to travel to Geneva, where they will pitch their ideas to the board of UNHCR, and will receive support from PwC and Leiden University as they develop a prototype. All prototypes will be available open source.

We noticed that many teams proposed chatbot-based solutions to the challenges we pitched, which is exciting for us as it suggests this is a promising area for technological development. mVAM is already exploring how chatbots could be used to help WFP’s work and we hope to find ways to collaborate further with the teams from the hackathon and other partners to vet other ideas in the area of two-way communications.


Also published on Medium.

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