New places, new tools: what’s up next for mVAM?

KOICA pic 2

We’ve just got back from Rwanda where we were holding a workshop on using mVAM to expand real-time food security and nutrition monitoring with Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs) and refugee populations. The project, which is made possible by the support of the Korean International Cooperation Agency (KOICA), will be implemented in ten countries in sub-Saharan Africa where WFP works.

What’s the project?

The KOICA project has two aims. First, it aims to empower information exchange with marginalized populations, specifically IDPs and Refugees. Secondly, it supports the collection of food security and nutrition data using the latest mobile and satellite technologies. This will happen in ten countries in Sub-Saharan Africa: the Central African Republic (CAR),The Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Kenya, Malawi, Niger, Nigeria, Rwanda, Somalia, South Sudan and Uganda.

How are we going to do this?

As you know, two-way communication systems are an important part of our work. As well as getting information that we can use to inform WFP programmes, we want to ensure that the line is open so that people in the communities we serve can contact us and access information that is useful to them. We’ve already been using Interactive Voice Response and live calls to share information with affected populations, and are now expanding our toolbox to include new technologies: Free Basics and a chatbot.

Remote data collection isn’t just done by mobile phones – VAM already uses other sources, such as  satellite imagery analysis – to understand the food security situation on the ground.  Under this project, we’ll also help countries incorporate similar analysis which will complement two-way communication systems to provide a fuller picture of the food security situation.

Finally, we’re going to harness our knowledge of Call Detail Records analysis: de-identified metadata collected via cell phone towers about the number of calls or messages people are sending and which towers they are using. We have already used this technique in Haiti to track displacement after Hurricane Matthew, and we’re really excited to transfer these ideas to another context to ensure we get up-to-date information on where affected communities are so we can better target food assistance in the right locations.

What happened at the workshop?

Representatives from all 10 country offices, three regional bureaus and staff from HQ came together to discuss the three main project components. During the workshop, the different country offices had the chance to learn more from members of the mVAM team about the specific tools they can harness and ensure their collected data is high quality, standardised and communicated effectively. However, the best part about bringing everyone together was that country teams could share their experiences about how they are already using mVAM tools. We heard from the Malawi country office about their Free Basics pilot, and Niger and Nigeria explained how they’re implementing IVR so affected communities can easily contact WFP, even after work hours. Sharing their different experiences and learning about how different tools have worked in each context not only gave everyone an overview of what mVAM is doing so far, it also helped everyone understand the implementation challenges and how to overcome them.

What’s next for the KOICA project?

We’re really excited for the next stage of the project. Each country office has now planned what tools they’re going to use to increase their communications with affected communities and how they will improve their existing data collection systems. It’s going to be great to see the impact these tools will have not only on WFP’s response, but also how they will empower the communities we’re serving. 

mVAM for nutrition: findings from Kenya

2WFP-Kusum_Hachhethu

Photo: WFP/Kusum Hachhethu

We’ve used mVAM to collect data on a range of things that impact food security – so what about information on nutrition? Back in October, we went to Kenya to conduct a study on whether we could use remote mobile data collection to gather information on women and children’s nutrition.

The summary of our findings from the case study are now available in a new report from mVAM and our partners in the study, WFP’s Nutrition Division and the World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF).

Read more:

kenya-report

Can we reach rural women via mobile phone? Kenya case study

SONY DSC

WFP/Kusum Hachhethu

 

A few months ago, we published a blog post on our plans to test collecting nutrition data through SMS in Malawi and through live voice calls in Kenya. We just got back from Kenya where we conducted a large-scale mode experiment with ICRAF to compare nutrition data collected face-to-face with data collected through phone calls placed by operators at a call center. But before we started our experiment, we did a qualitative formative study to understand rural women’s phone access and use.

We traveled to 16 villages in Baringo and Kitui counties in Kenya, where we conducted focus group discussions and in-depth interviews with women. We also conducted key informant interviews with mobile phone vendors, local nutritionists, and local government leaders.

So in Kenya, can rural women be reached via mobile phone?

Here are the preliminary findings from our qualitative study:

  1. Ownership: Women’s phone ownership is high in both counties. However, ownership was higher in Kitui than Baringo, which is more pastoralist. From our focus group discussions and interviews, we estimate that 80-90% of women own phones in Kitui and 60-70% own phones in Baringo.
  1. Access: The majority of women had access to phones through inter- and intra-household sharing even if they didn’t own one themselves. This suggests that even women who don’t own a phone personally have access to phones that they may be able to use to participate in phone surveys.
  1. Usage: Women mostly use phones to make and receive calls, not send SMS. This supports our hypothesis that voice calls, not SMS, would be the optimal modality to reach women through mobile surveys.
  1. Willingness: Women were enthusiastic about participating in phone surveys during our focus group discussions and in-depth interviews, implying that they are interested in phone surveys and willing to take part.
  1. Trust: Unknown numbers create trust issues, but they are not insurmountable. Women voiced concerns about receiving phone calls from unknown numbers. Despite these trust issues, we were eventually able to successfully conduct our phone surveys after sensitizing the community, using existing community and government administration structures.
  1. Network: Poor network coverage, not gender norms or access, is the biggest barrier to phone surveys in the two counties. Women identified network coverage as the biggest barrier for communication. Some parts of the counties had poor to no network coverage. However, we found that phone ownership was high even in these areas, and women would travel to find network hotspots to make or receive phone calls.

So in conclusion, yes, in Kenya it is possible to reach rural women by phone.
Our findings from Kitui and Baringo counties show that we can reach women in similar contexts with mobile methodologies to collect information on their diet as well as their child’s diet.

We are also analysing the quantitative data from our mode experiment to find out whether data on women and children’s diet collected via live phone operators gives the same results as data collected via traditional face-to-face interviews.